Changes in the brain that support physical and psychological dependency on mind-altering substances are the direct cause of addiction, but those changes do not occur at random. Addiction experts believe drug addiction emerges from an interplay of genetic and environmental factors, although one factor or the other may be strong enough to make a person vulnerable to addiction in some instances.
For many recovering alcoholics, the mental health aspects of treatment are the most important. Improving mental health means helping patients better understand the chronic condition they are suffering from. It means equipping them with the tools they need to control their thoughts and emotions, avoid addictive triggers, and just stay away from alcohol altogether.

More than 7 percent of all American adults have an alcohol use disorder. These adults drink too much, too often, and in ways that harm their health, their happiness, and their relationships. An intervention, in which the family outlines alcohol’s consequences, can push these people to enter treatment programs. Once there, counseling sessions, relapse prevention coaching, and support group work can help to support recovery. Relapse rates for alcohol fall within the 40-60 percent range, so people often need to stick with aftercare for the rest of life.
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8]
For over 75 years, the standard has been to use group meetings for therapy. Passages does not endorse this approach. Instead, we discovered that one-on-one therapy is much more effective. Your team of therapists will customize your treatment to ensure that you’re getting the finest one-on-one care available. Currently, we offer 16 different types of therapy, all of which you will benefit from during your stay at Passages.
Different rehabs are based upon different philosophies, and this can mean the enhancement of addiction treatment with distinct specialized services. For example, a religious rehab may include worship services or religion classes and other offerings that enhance the spiritual side of recovery while a holistic alcohol rehab may include yoga, meditation, acupuncture and other alternative methods of treatment.
Medications are used for 2 different reasons—to manage acute withdrawal symptoms and cravings and to maintain abstinence once withdrawal has resolved. Some treatment programs offer medical detox as a part of their services, while others require that you complete detox prior to entering their program. In some instances, once you achieve medical stability and are drug-free, you may begin a regimen of maintenance medications. Only certain addictions can be treated with medication. These include opioids, such as heroin and prescription painkillers, and alcohol. The commonly-used medications include:1,2,3

In the past, alcohol rehab programs provided a standardized set of treatments for each patient, regardless of age, gender, psychiatric history, or demographic group. Today, alcohol treatment programs and alcohol treatment centers have become more specialized in order to meet the needs of a diverse, highly varied group of patients. Choosing a course of treatment has become more complicated, but the results of a careful search are likely to be more successful — and more satisfying to the individual.
Die Suchtselbsthilfegruppen ergänzen seit mehr als 40 Jahren im Deutschen Roten Kreuz (DRK) das professionelle Suchthilfeangebot. Die Betroffenen finden dort aus eigener Kraft zu einem Leben in zufriedener Abstinenz und stärken gegenseitig ihre Ressourcen. Die Gruppenmitglieder arbeiten teilweise anonym und fangen Hilfesuchende in schwierigen Situationen unterschiedslos auf.

More problematically, they are also not removed from their home environment which has proven to facilitate the drug-taking behaviour which has led to addiction, and are still able to contact their dealer/s if the temptation to relapse proves overpowering. Their whole recovery rests upon their strength of will – which in some cases may not prove sufficient at critical times.


Challenge and change your thoughts. When experiencing a craving, many people have a tendency to remember only the positive effects of the drug and forget the negative consequences. Therefore, you may find it helpful to remind yourself that you really won’t feel better if you use and that you stand to lose a lot. Sometimes it is helpful to have these consequences listed on a small card that you keep with you. What is Alcohol Withdrawal Like? Alcohol Withdrawal Symptoms Explained

Our highly qualified treatment team possess extensive clinical experience in treating alcohol addiction, and are able to deliver a wide range of established techniques to help you to address your alcohol addiction symptoms, and resolve the underlying causes and triggers for your alcohol addiction. We ensure that each individual who seeks support with us is placed at the centre of their alcohol addiction treatment and rehabilitation journey and is involved in any decisions that are made about their care. This ensures that you benefit from a truly collaborative and personalised treatment experience and the most positive outcomes for you as an individual. Our non-judgemental, highly compassionate addiction treatment environments provide you with the ideal setting in which to address your challenges and achieve and full and sustainable recovery.
If the patient has an antisocial personality (ie, severe problems with family, peers, school, and police before age 15 y and before the onset of alcohol problems), recovery is less likely. If the patient has primary depression, anxiety disorder, or another potentially contributory disorder (the other disorder must antedate the problems with alcohol or it must be a significant problem during long periods of sobriety), treat this primary problem aggressively. Step 1 - Admitting We Are Powerless
The National Institute on Drug Abuse states, “Addiction is defined as a chronic, relapsing brain disease that is characterized by compulsive drug seeking and use, despite harmful consequences.” Addiction can result from a variety of factors and catalysts, including genetic predisposition, circumstances, environment, trauma and mental health disorders. While addiction often starts with drug abuse, it is not an indication of a person’s moral status or stability. In fact, many addictions spring from prescription drug use or casual use of legal substances.

Support groups provide people with understanding peers and ongoing support, in church basements, community centers, and public facilities scattered all across the country. Here, people can come together to discuss addiction’s difficulties, and they can meet with other addicted people to gain support and insight. Alumni groups are similar, in that they link peers together to discuss addiction, but these groups contain people who all worked within the same facility for help.
The risk of relapse in drug addiction recovery is substantial, and that makes outpatient aftercare programs vitally important for newly-sober individuals, as well as for those working to maintain their recovery. Regular therapy sessions and 12-step (or alternative) peer group meetings can provide much-needed guidance and moral support to people in the midst of making major lifestyle changes, and family participation in ongoing relapse prevention programs can boost their effectiveness even further. While aftercare programs don’t guarantee permanent wellness, they can significantly decrease the likelihood of relapse and make it easier for recovering addicts to get back on track if and when they slip.
The help of family members can be absolutely invaluable in terms of supporting the addict through their recovery over the long term after they leave rehab, and they can get support and advice on what they need to do to continue to encourage their loved one through the process of their recovery, how to avoid triggering them, how to help them prevent relapse and various other things which together can make the difference between success and failure in recovery.
We also have a heated swimming pool so you can enjoy the outdoors and the benefits of aqua fitness that extends the summer months. Our activities will also organise crafting workshops, computer skills training, and much more so you can get back or reignite that creative spark that was put on hold all during drug addiction. The grounds of Searidge Drug Rehab feature a large outside space full of green pastures and a stone’s throw of the ocean that will help you enjoy nature’s beauty that is conducive to rest, relaxation and recovery.
In the past, alcohol rehab programs provided a standardized set of treatments for each patient, regardless of age, gender, psychiatric history, or demographic group. Today, alcohol treatment programs and alcohol treatment centers have become more specialized in order to meet the needs of a diverse, highly varied group of patients. Choosing a course of treatment has become more complicated, but the results of a careful search are likely to be more successful — and more satisfying to the individual.
Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
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