This resource page will provide you with everything you need to know, from alcohol treatment centers and payment options, differences between inpatient and outpatient programs, finding an alcohol treatment center, and taking the first steps toward sobriety and recovery. If you’re here seeking information for a friend or family member, we’ve also included resources on how to help a friend or family member, along with intervention strategies.
As with most other chronic diseases, such as diabetes, asthma, or heart disease, treatment for drug addiction generally isn’t a cure. However, addiction is treatable and can be successfully managed. People who are recovering from an addiction will be at risk for relapse for years and possibly for their whole lives. Research shows that combining addiction treatment medicines with behavioral therapy ensures the best chance of success for most patients. Treatment approaches tailored to each patient’s drug use patterns and any co-occurring medical, mental, and social problems can lead to continued recovery.
When you or someone close to you needs drug abuse rehab, it can be hard to know where exactly to find help. Without the proper help, however, substance abuse can lead to potential life-threatening situations. Additionally, drug abuse affects not only the life of the individual user but also the lives of his or her family. Fortunately, there are a variety of effective treatment methods to help individuals overcome their drug addictions.
It is important that you know how to act when triggers or cravings present themselves. If you have a plan in place, it can help to prevent a full-blown relapse. It may be that you will get in touch with your counsellor or sponsor, or perhaps distraction will help. You might find that going for a walk or doing something else to keep you busy can help the cravings subside. Inappropriate Things to Say at a Meeting (Recovery Comedy)
1. First, assessment – Upon entering alcohol rehabilitation, medical staff will screen you to assess your personal situation and create a program that is unique to you. This will likely include a physical exam, a urinalysis drug test, a psychological screening and an assessment of personal circumstances. The aim here is to understand the extent of alcohol abuse and to create a program that will allow you to succeed.
There are several differences between inpatient and outpatient care. Inpatient care is a more intense level of care than outpatient care, which is often a step down from inpatient care. Unlike inpatient care, outpatient treatment does not require clients to stay overnight. Clients can come to the facility regularly (daily, weekly, etc.) for a set number of hours a week, and go home after their session. This allows them to maintain their work schedule and tend to any other off-site responsibilities. Care is less intensive than the inpatient level, as clients typically no longer require round-the-clock care.
Certain drugs (like cocaine, heroin, and methamphetamines) are infamous for how they can mess up the brain. Most people know to beware of their potency and danger. Other substances (such as alcohol, marijuana and painkillers) tend to be viewed quite differently. For many Americans, they are deemed to be much less dangerous. But is this view accurate?

The different types of rehab facilities fall into two categories or “settings.” The two settings are inpatient (full-time rehab) and outpatient (part-time rehab). Inpatient means the client lives at the facility, and each step of the rehab process is typically completed there. Patients who attend an outpatient facility return home after treatment each day and often complete the steps of rehab at different facilities. Below is a comparison of the most common program options within those two rehab settings.
Remember though, overcoming alcoholism is a process. Less than half of individuals relapse after achieving one year of sobriety. That number reduces to less than 15 percent who relapse after five years of sobriety. For the greatest chance of long-term sobriety after completing an inpatient or outpatient program, you should participate in local support groups and continue with counseling. Treating alcoholism is an investment in your future. It will not only make a huge difference in your life, but also the lives of those around you such as family members and friends. Rehab Nightmare: Drugs, Chains and Canes - Full Documentary - BBC Africa Eye

If you fear that your loved ones will reject or judge you, consider inviting them to a session with a substance abuse counselor or a 12-step meeting. Educating your loved ones about the realities of drug addiction may make them more receptive and supportive. Having the support of professionals and peers will also help you stick with your convictions about recovery.
Before entering a rehab facility, patients may have to undergo detox treatment. Detox is the process in which a patient rids his or her body of the addictive substance. From start to finish, this process varies in length, but often takes about a week. As part of a medical detox program, recovering patients will be monitored by doctors and nurses and given medications to manage withdrawal, when appropriate. Once a patient completes detox, he or she is ready for rehab.
After occasional use comes alcohol abuse. This stage involves more frequent use of alcohol and you may be drinking more than the recommended amount on a regular basis. You might start drinking for more than just social reasons. Maybe you are drinking alcohol to make you feel better or different. You might be using it to boost your confidence or to alleviate feelings of stress or anxiety. This can lead to a cycle of abuse and an emotional attachment to alcohol.
Assessment and evaluation– Treatment typically begins with a complete physical and psychological assessment to establish which method of rehabilitation should be used. This is completed by both physicians and treatment counselors. Medical and mental health records are read. Family and alcohol-use histories are also reviewed. This process helps to chart the best course of action. Oftentimes, follow-up reviews are necessary to update or adjust treatment measures. Every aspect of care is based on a personalized treatment plan.
The path to drug addiction begins with the voluntary act of taking drugs. But over time, a person's ability to choose not to do so becomes compromised. Seeking and taking the drug becomes compulsive. This is mostly due to the effects of long-term drug exposure on brain function. Addiction affects parts of the brain involved in reward and motivation, learning and memory, and control over behavior.

It can be difficult to recognize when casual drinking has crossed the line into abuse or addiction. It can be even harder to decide that it is time to do something about it.   Knowing what addiction looks and feels like can be challenging for loved ones, let alone for the person who is addicted to alcohol. If people are aware of what the signs of alcoholism are, it can be easier to determine when it’s time to enter rehab in order to stop the cycle of addiction and work toward recovery from alcoholism.  
It’s vital to bear in mind that the process of recovery is not complete the moment you leave rehab – in fact, it is often best to work on the basis that recovery is never complete, and that it is a lifelong process at which you need to work continually in order truly to protect yourself from temptation and the chance of returning to the terrible condition of addiction.
Alongside our psychotherapy, we offer more varied alternative therapies that help reinforce the clinical alcohol rehab treatments. This keeps the days spent with us at Searidge Alcohol Rehab both interesting and rewarding. Our program includes mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, yoga, relaxation therapy, creative art therapy, Tai Chi and First Nations Healing Rituals.
Most drugs affect the brain's "reward circuit," causing euphoria as well as flooding it with the chemical messenger dopamine. A properly functioning reward system motivates a person to repeat behaviors needed to thrive, such as eating and spending time with loved ones. Surges of dopamine in the reward circuit cause the reinforcement of pleasurable but unhealthy behaviors like taking drugs, leading people to repeat the behavior again and again. A One Hour Journey Through the 12 Steps with Tommy Rosen
Intake lasts only a couple of hours, but alcohol detox can last anywhere from five to 14 days, depending upon the withdrawal symptoms you experience. Withdrawal symptoms will vary depending on your history with alcohol and side effects from withdrawal can include anxiety or depression, tremors, mood swings, irritability, insomnia, lack of appetite, sweating, confusion, fever, seizures and more.

Family members of rehab patients can seek drug rehab information by talking to the counselors and doctors at the facility. Friends and family members can help and support patients by learning about drug addiction. They may do this by participating in counseling sessions with the patient. Counselors in rehab facilities can also teach family members and friends of patients how they can help. They can learn about the coping skills that the patients are learning, the different drug abuse triggers, and the best ways to show love and support.


Be upfront about your history of drug use when seeking medical treatment. If you need a medical or dental procedure done, be upfront and find a provider who will work with you in either prescribing alternatives or the absolute minimum medication necessary. You should never feel ashamed or humiliated about previous drug use or be denied medication for pain; if that happens, find another provider.
Many people don't understand why or how other people become addicted to drugs. They may mistakenly think that those who use drugs lack moral principles or willpower and that they could stop their drug use simply by choosing to. In reality, drug addiction is a complex disease, and quitting usually takes more than good intentions or a strong will. Drugs change the brain in ways that make quitting hard, even for those who want to. Fortunately, researchers know more than ever about how drugs affect the brain and have found treatments that can help people recover from drug addiction and lead productive lives.
At Burning Tree, we know that finding the right treatment center plays a critical role in stopping the cycle of addiction.  Our long-term approach to treatment makes relapse prevention a signature trademark of everything we do.  After carefully assessing and evaluating all prospective clients, we approach professional treatment on a case by case basis to ensure the highest quality care possible.  Our onsite staff of addiction specialists and therapists provides round the clock supervision and care in the treatment of alcohol/drug dependent behavior and mental disorders. 
More problematically, they are also not removed from their home environment which has proven to facilitate the drug-taking behaviour which has led to addiction, and are still able to contact their dealer/s if the temptation to relapse proves overpowering. Their whole recovery rests upon their strength of will – which in some cases may not prove sufficient at critical times.
You can also augment your loved one’s ability to remain clean and sober at home by providing a positive, stress-free environment and learning how best to avoid enabling behaviors. Like the specifics of inpatient drug rehab, the treatment services chosen during aftercare should be based on the needs of the individual and the areas where they need the most support in recovery.

Stimulants like cocaine and meth can cause long-lasting damage to the brain, altering the way you think, feel and experience reality. Drug addiction facts from the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry highlight that chronic cocaine use can cause the brain to shrink, a condition called cerebral atrophy. Long-term cocaine use can cause cognitive impairment even after the drug is no longer used, while those who have used methamphetamine may continue to experience hallucinations and psychotic episodes after quitting.
Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms. Woman Turns to Rehab After Struggling With Drugs, Alcohol: Part 1
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