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More than 86 percent of people in the US drink alcohol at least once during their lifetime, according to the National Institute of Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). It is common for most people to enjoy an occasional cocktail or a glass of wine in the company of friends or at a party. However, some people drink far more often than that, and still others drink heavily or binge drink on a regular or even frequent basis.


Alcoholism is an illness affecting millions of people around the world. If you do not suffer with it yourself, you may know someone who does. Contrary to what many people think, alcoholism does not target those with no willpower or who are morally weak. It is not something that affects ‘bad’ people. Alcoholism is a chronic illness that requires treatment.
Drugs affect the way a person thinks, feels, behaves and how they look. But substance use disorders are often accompanied by co-occuring mental health disorders like anxiety or depression. Some people may use drugs as a form of self-medication for these issues, while other people may develop a mental health disorder after taking substances. Either way, it’s important to look out for psychological and behavioral changes in friends or loved ones who might be struggling with addiction: Drug rehabilitation
  I am a 63 year old woman. When I came to Costa Rica Treatment Center I probably weighed 89 pounds. I had no desire to live for weeks. I couldn't get out of bed. As soon as I was able to get up, the staff began giving me nutritional drinks to get the poison out of my system. They would talk to me at 4 in the morning when I couldn't get the idea of getting high out of my head. Eventually I started eating and was served 3 nutritional prepared meals a day. The talks never stopped. All of my needs were met. There was never a cross word spoken. The staff that nurtured me consisted of a medical M.D. a behavioral health specialist and life coach woman, 2 psychologists social worker a house manager,a wonderful cleaning woman, and the boss.The treatment received here is thorough and rounded. I now weigh 110 pounds have been schooled in A.A. and N.A. meetings. I'm looking forward to a new life. I am so very thankful.
Inpatient or residential treatment is the most intensive level of care, with round-the-clock monitoring and clinical management to alleviate withdrawal symptoms and provide structure. After the detox phase, the patient lives at the facility full-time while receiving therapy, group counseling, medication management, holistic therapies and other services.
Most countries have legislation which brings various drugs and drug-like substances under the control of licensing systems. Typically this legislation covers any or all of the opiates, amphetamines, cannabinoids, cocaine, barbiturates, benzodiazepines, anesthetics, hallucinogenics, derivatives and a variety of more modern synthetic drugs. Unlicensed production, supply or possession is a criminal offence.
Addiction affects not just the addict but also everyone that person comes into contact with. The addict will likely suffer physical consequences, social consequences, emotional consequences, financial consequences, and perhaps even legal consequences as a result of their drug use. As the drug addict’s personal life falls apart, their work and health will likely suffer as well. Drug addicts are more likely to have domestic violence problems, to lose their jobs, and to be arrested than those who are not addicts, proving that addiction, if left untreated, can negatively impact every facet of a person’s life. 

This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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