Recovery housing, which provides supervised, short-term housing for patients, often following other types of inpatient or residential treatment. Recovery housing can help people make the transition to an independent life—for example, helping them learn how to manage finances or seek employment, as well as connecting them to support services in the community.
Outpatient treatment is the most flexible level of care. Recovery services are provided in a day center, clinic, rehab facility, or other location, while the patient lives at home. Outpatient clients can participate in counseling, therapy, 12-step programming, and other recovery services without giving up their self-determination. This level of care is recommended for patients who have completed an inpatient program, or for medically stable individuals who have a high level of motivation to reach sobriety.
Exposure to other demographic groups in treatment can be an equalizing experience, demonstrating the reality of alcoholism as a universal disease. On the other hand, some patients feel more comfortable and can express themselves more effectively in settings where they can associate with their peers. Patients who are also professionals have unique stressors and needs that can be more effectively addressed in specialized programs.
Alcohol Health & Research World notes that outpatient alcohol detox programs can be as safe and effective as inpatient detox, as long as the patients have been professionally screened and matched to the right level of care. With outpatient treatment, the average length of stay in rehab is usually shorter, and the cost is generally less. However, for patients at risk of serious alcohol withdrawal symptoms, or for those with co-occurring medical or psychiatric disorders, inpatient alcohol detox is often more appropriate. Amazing Alcohol Addiction Treatment
You won't be judged. It’s probably difficult for you to talk about your drinking, because you're afraid nobody will understand you and they'll criticize you. So you bottle everything up inside, which makes you feel more guilt and shame, and makes you want to drink even more. The people at a self-help group won't judge you because they've heard it all before. They've done it all before. They know you're not crazy. You're addicted.
An average of about three months of residential treatment seems to be effective. The optimal treatment time seems to be similar in non-residential treatment, suggesting a combination of residential and non-residential treatment might be effective over that time. But completing the treatment program and actively participating seem to be more important than treatment setting or length.

Residential drug treatment can be broadly divided into two camps: 12-step programs and therapeutic communities. Twelve-step programs are a nonclinical support-group and faith-based approach to treating addiction. Therapy typically involves the use of cognitive-behavioral therapy, an approach that looks at the relationship between thoughts, feelings and behaviors, addressing the root cause of maladaptive behavior. Cognitive-behavioral therapy treats addiction as a behavior rather than a disease, and so is subsequently curable, or rather, unlearnable. Cognitive-behavioral therapy programs recognize that, for some individuals, controlled use is a more realistic possibility.[28]

Upon exiting treatment, a patient may be prescribed a drug like disulfiram, which prevents the body from chemically processing alcohol, causing an unpleasant reaction if the patient relapses or attempts to relapse. Because of disulfiram’s toxicity, it has to be taken under the supervision of a doctor, as unregulated usage can cause strong, even fatal reactions. Powerful Talk on Overcoming Addiction
Some factors are relatively straightforward – for example, location (unless you feel that you would benefit psychologically from knowing that you are as far away as possible from your dealer/s and your drug-taking environment, it is usually best to look for a facility relatively close to you) and cost (it may be that some specifically luxury facilities are outside what is affordable for you).
An alcohol rehab treatment center is a place for healing, learning a healthy lifestyle and receiving support. Today’s proven, evidence-based approach to treating co-occurring disorders is to integrate the services of addiction counselors and medical professionals. Through unified goals and coordinated efforts,the whole person is treated. Tools for maintaining abstinence and physical and mental stability are provided.7Michael’s House is a residential alcohol rehab facility in Palm Springs, California, that does just that. Our caring professionals seek to uncover the root causes of patients’ addictions and mental distress. We help them establish a healthier and more fulfilling lifestyle.
Alongside our psychotherapy, we offer more varied alternative therapies that help reinforce the clinical alcohol rehab treatments. This keeps the days spent with us at Searidge Alcohol Rehab both interesting and rewarding. Our program includes mindfulness meditation, acupuncture, yoga, relaxation therapy, creative art therapy, Tai Chi and First Nations Healing Rituals. The harm reduction model of drug addiction treatment | Mark Tyndall
Our drug and alcohol addiction treatment programs are based on science, evidence and our experience of what works best in helping people get sober and stay sober. Hazelden Betty Ford pioneered the field’s leading approach to addiction treatment and we continue to evolve and advance the use of evidence-based treatments in order to provide our patients with the best opportunity for lifelong recovery from substance use disorder. Some of the evidence-based treatments our clinicians use include:

^ Volkow ND, Koob GF, McLellan AT (January 2016). "Neurobiologic Advances from the Brain Disease Model of Addiction". N. Engl. J. Med. 374 (4): 363–371. doi:10.1056/NEJMra1511480. PMID 26816013. Substance-use disorder: A diagnostic term in the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5) referring to recurrent use of alcohol or other drugs that causes clinically and functionally significant impairment, such as health problems, disability, and failure to meet major responsibilities at work, school, or home. Depending on the level of severity, this disorder is classified as mild, moderate, or severe.
The specific medicines prescribed will vary depending upon your own particular experience of withdrawal and the symptoms you are manifesting, and it may be that certain medications will not be appropriate depending on your substance of abuse or your own personal health history; an experienced medical professional will be able to make those decisions to ensure you go through withdrawal as safely as possible. What happens in rehab?
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