An individual who suffers from both mental illness and alcoholism will need to undergo different treatment. Because alcohol withdrawal symptoms cause a person to experience some psychiatric stress, an alcoholic with mental health issues will find it much more difficult to resist turning to drink. The NIAAA believes the some self-help groups, such as Alcoholics Anonymous, are not effective when it comes to treating people with a dual-diagnosis of both alcoholism and mental illness. This is because these groups tend to specifically focus on the actual addiction itself, rather than any underlying psychological problems. Anti-depressants are improving all the time and it is believed that while a self-help group may not be useful for a dual-diagnosis individual by itself, if the individual is on the appropriate medication and receiving the appropriate psychological therapy it can prove to be just as effective as with other alcoholic individuals.
People who misuse alcohol are often addicted to the act of drinking, as much as the alcohol itself. For that reason, you may need to learn skills and coping mechanisms to help you avoid alcohol once you leave a treatment center or return to familiar environments where the urge to drink may be stronger. Your doctor may refer you to a counselor or other treatment program to help you learn those skills and coping strategies. Recovery Group Therapy for Drug & Alcohol counseling in South Orange County, CA
In the precontemplation phase, the individual does not express any interest in the need for change. Many individuals with substance use problems are firmly entrenched in this stage. The options in dealing with patients in this stage are limited and include pointing out the discrepancy between patient action and patient goals, suggesting that the patient bring a family member to the next appointment, and suggesting a 2-week abstinence trial. Involuntarily Committed to Drug & Alcohol Treatment (2018)

State-funded programs are more likely to cover a full range of treatment options, though they may not yet have access the very latest in cutting-edge treatment technology or treatment center amenities that some private programs are able to offer. Despite the likelihood of having more basic or standard recovery settings, these state programs still provide effective treatment as well as valuable post-treatment support.
Without a proper withdrawal recovering alcoholics are at risk of experiencing some or all of the symptoms mentioned above. The most common ones are chills or sweats, anxiety and depression and irritability and mood swings. More severe cases can lead to seizures, blackouts or DTs (delirium tremens). Untreated withdrawal symptoms peak in the first few days of detoxification. Every individual experience of detox is different, depending on the level of alcohol abuse. This can last from a few days to six with a varying level of severity. Our experienced medical team will work to help alleviate the associated risks and symptoms.
This kind of treatment is known as Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT), because it introduces the patient to new and healthier ways of thinking (“cognitive”) and acting (“behavioral”). The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism says that the success of alcohol treatment depends on “changing a person’s behaviors and expectations about alcohol.”
You’ll want to be thorough while searching for the substance abuse treatment program that is right for you. Not all rehabs are equal, so it’s important that you know what you’re looking for. Not everyone will benefit from the same type of rehab so some priorities may depend on the individual’s preferences, but some standard things to look for include:
The way it works is when people normally drink alcohol, endorphins are released into the brain, and this reinforces the behavior of drinking alcohol. Revia and Vivitrol block the feel-good endorphins. Much like when Pavlov's dogs were presented with food when a bell was rung, these dogs became conditioned to salivate at the sound of the bell alone. However, when these dogs continued to be presented with the ringing bell and no food, the salivating stopped. Steps 1, 2, & 3 Guided Meditation by Amie Gabriel
Don't let financial constraints stop you from living a life free of alcoholism. Regardless of whether you don't have insurance, your insurance benefits ran out, or your insurance refuses to cover your alcohol dependency treatment, you can get treatment. Free alcohol rehabilitation is available if you really want it. By admitting you have a problem and need help you have already completed the first and most important step of pursuing a life of sobriety.
Assessment and evaluation– Treatment typically begins with a complete physical and psychological assessment to establish which method of rehabilitation should be used. This is completed by both physicians and treatment counselors. Medical and mental health records are read. Family and alcohol-use histories are also reviewed. This process helps to chart the best course of action. Oftentimes, follow-up reviews are necessary to update or adjust treatment measures. Every aspect of care is based on a personalized treatment plan.

This resource page will provide you with everything you need to know, from alcohol treatment centers and payment options, differences between inpatient and outpatient programs, finding an alcohol treatment center, and taking the first steps toward sobriety and recovery. If you’re here seeking information for a friend or family member, we’ve also included resources on how to help a friend or family member, along with intervention strategies.


Nalmefene, an opiate antagonist that is similar in its chemical structure to naltrexone, is one of the most recent drugs being investigated for the treatment of alcoholism. Like naltrexone (sold as ReVia, Depade, or Vivitrol), nalmefene deprives the person struggling with substance use of the pleasurable feelings associated with drinking. But nalmefene is less toxic to the liver than naltrexone. As of 2013, nalmefene was still undergoing clinical trials through the U.S. National Institutes of Health before receiving FDA approval. From Rehab to a Body Bag | Dying for Treatment: VICE Reports (Full Length)
×