Substance abuse has plagued the nation for decades. This has prompted the need for rehab centers, but these facilities must first consider the dynamics of drug and alcohol abuse to effectively treat it. For example, a man who’s been struggling with severe alcoholism for five years will likely need a different form of treatment than a woman who’s been abusing alcohol for only a few months. This is why drug rehab centers like The Recovery Village offer individualized inpatient and outpatient rehab programs — including inpatient detox — to allow them to accommodate the varying needs of patients.
We review all of these options with each outgoing resident to make sure that they have the best plan to work with their routines and needs. Whether you are able to engage with the program for hours or minutes, we will find the simplest and most effective way for you to participate in our aftercare program. We want you to succeed and will do everything we can to make this final stage both accessible and productive in order to support you in maintaining sobriety on your own time.
Inpatient or residential treatment  can also be very effective, especially for those with more severe problems (including co-occurring disorders). Licensed residential treatment facilities offer 24-hour structured and intensive care, including safe housing and medical attention. Residential treatment facilities may use a variety of therapeutic approaches, and they are generally aimed at helping the patient live a drug-free, crime-free lifestyle after treatment. Examples of residential treatment settings include:
Lastly, drug rehab is important because it affords participants the opportunity to construct new habits. One of the more common characteristics of addicts is poor self-discipline and care. Rehab provides these individuals with the chance not only to set goals but to accomplish them as well. Routinely achieving goals provides addicts with an improved sense of self-worth and resolve.
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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