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You won't be judged. It’s probably difficult for you to talk about your drinking, because you're afraid nobody will understand you and they'll criticize you. So you bottle everything up inside, which makes you feel more guilt and shame, and makes you want to drink even more. The people at a self-help group won't judge you because they've heard it all before. They've done it all before. They know you're not crazy. You're addicted.
Outpatient treatment is the next step down in a continuum of care. It is also a rehabilitation option for individuals whose addiction is less severe and doesn’t require inpatient treatment. Clients in this phase of rehab drug treatment visit the facility regularly, but do not stay overnight. This approach allows the individual to receive drug treatment while maintaining family and job responsibilities.
If you checked off four to six boxes from each list, your loved one meets the criteria for alcohol addiction. Although he or she may still appear to be functioning normally at work, school, or home, there is a strong risk that the disease will progress to more serious consequences, such as illness, legal problems, or an accident, if left untreated. If you haven’t confronted your loved about their problem, it’s time to have that talk. Meanwhile, seek advice from a substance abuse counselor or family therapist about how to get your loved one into a residential alcohol treatment facility or an intensive outpatient program.
It is important to understand that without timely, expert support for your drug addiction, your symptoms can become progressively worse over time, and you may find that you need to consume more and more of the substance in question in order to experience the desired effects. Continued drug use can have an extremely negative effect on all areas of your life including your hobbies, social life, work performance, ability to function on a day-to-day basis, your relationships with family and friends, and your general physical and psychological wellbeing. Untreated drug addiction may also lead to the development of alcohol addiction and other behavioural addictions, causing a whole host of additional problems.
Research shows drug use is more common among arrestees than the general population. The Office of National Drug Control Policy reported that 63 to 83 percent of people arrested in five major metropolitan areas in 2013 tested positive for at least one illicit drug. The three most common drugs present during tests were marijuana, cocaine and opiates, and many people tested positive for multiple drugs.

Note: These PET scans compare the brain of an individual with a history of cocaine use disorder (middle and right) to the brain of an individual without a history of cocaine use (left). The person who has had a cocaine use disorder has lower levels of the D2 dopamine receptor (depicted in red) in the striatum one month (middle) and four months (right) after stopping cocaine use compared to the non-user. The level of dopamine receptors in the brain of the cocaine user are higher at the 4-month mark (right), but have not returned to the levels observed in the non-user (left).


Getting alcohol out of the addicted person’s system is the first part of recovery. People with a severe alcohol addiction can experience intense withdrawal symptoms. A supervised alcohol detox is usually necessary for people addicted to alcohol to prevent potentially fatal complications. Shaking, sweating, seizures, and hallucinations are possible alcohol withdrawal symptoms.

If you checked one to three boxes from each of the two checklists, there’s a strong chance that your loved one has an alcohol problem. However, some of these signs could also be red flags for a mental or physical illness. Encourage your loved one to be evaluated by a physician or therapist. Talk to him or her about alcohol abuse, and express your support for further treatment, such as therapy, counseling, or a 12-step program. You or your loved one can also call a free alcohol hotline for more information. Drug Addict Couple Torn Apart For Rehab | The Jeremy Kyle Show
Drug addiction, also called substance use disorder, is a disease that affects a person's brain and behavior and leads to an inability to control the use of a legal or illegal drug or medication. Substances such as alcohol, marijuana and nicotine also are considered drugs. When you're addicted, you may continue using the drug despite the harm it causes.
The best way to tell your loved ones that you’re addicted is to be as honest and as open as possible. Be prepared for the possibility that they won’t understand your disease — even today, many people don’t realize that addiction is a chronic condition on the same level as diabetes, cancer, or hypertension. Your loved ones may criticize you; they may even try to persuade you that you don’t have a problem. It’s important to stand firm in your new self-awareness and stay on track with your plan for treatment.
The National Institute of Mental Health defines depression as a common but serious mood disorder that causes severe symptoms that can affect how you feel, think and handle daily activities. These symptoms must be present for at least two weeks in order for an individual to be diagnosed with depression. In many cases, depression and substance abuse occur simultaneously. Sometimes depression precedes substance abuse, and other times, the reverse is true. In addition to facilities that treat substance use and co-occurring disorders, there are various inpatient facilities for mental health alone. As an inpatient for depression, you can receive individualized care at The Recovery Village. Step 1 of the 12 Steps for Recovery from Addiction | Guided Meditation
This group of potent pain-relieving substances includes all drugs that are derived from opium, a compound found in the opium poppy. Some of these drugs, like morphine and codeine, are classified as non-synthetic opiates, while others, like heroin, hydrocodone, methadone, and oxycodone, are produced synthetically in laboratories. Until recently, heroin was considered to be the most addictive of the opiates. Today, however, opiate pain medications have surpassed heroin and cocaine in their popularity as drugs of abuse. According to Harvard University, the number of opiate addicts in the US increased threefold between 1991 and 2001, largely because of the increase in nonmedical use of drugs like hydrocodone (Vicodin), oxycodone (OxyContin, Percocet) and hydromorphone (Dilaudid). Harvard estimates that as of 2007, approximately 2 million people in the US were dependent on opiates, a number that continues to increase.
Urge surf. Many people try to cope with their urges by toughing it out. But some cravings are too strong to ignore. When this happens, it can be useful to stay with the urge until it passes. This technique is called urge surfing. Imagine yourself as a surfer who will ride the wave of your drug craving, staying on top of it until it crests, breaks, and turns into less powerful, foamy surf. When you ride out the craving, without trying to battle, judge, or ignore it, you’ll see that it passes more quickly than you’d think. Alabama rehab
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