As alcohol abuse progresses from dependency to addiction, your need for alcohol will become increasingly overwhelming. You may start to spend more and more of your time drinking or thinking about drinking, leaving little time for anyone or anything else. This can affect your ability to take care of responsibilities at home and work, and can have a negative impact on your relationships with family members, friends, and work colleagues.
The Hazelden Betty Ford Center is one of the most successful and well-recognized addiction recovery organizations in the nation. They have many treatment centers from the west to the east coast. Hazelden Betty Ford uses evidence-based treatment, the traditional 12-step program and specialized programs for patients based on mental disorders and even occupation. The center recommends at least 90 days for residential treatment, for the best rates of success. They have a reported 80% rate of recovery. The center has a complete, multidisciplinary treatment team; small group sizes; and a low patient-to-counselor ratio.

All drugs–nicotine, cocaine, marijuana and others–affect the brain’s “reward” circuit, which is part of the limbic system. This area of the brain affects instinct and mood. Drugs target this system, which causes large amounts of dopamine—a brain chemical that helps regulate emotions and feelings of pleasure—to flood the brain. This flood of dopamine is what causes a “high.” It’s one of the main causes of drug addiction.
Seek advice and support from others. Counselors, therapists, and support groups can be valuable sources of advice when you’re trying to deal with an addicted loved one. A substance abuse therapist can give you pointers on how to communicate effectively with someone who’s in denial. Twelve-step groups like Al-Anon or Nar-Anon can offer support and coping strategies, as well.
Stimulants, such as tobacco, cocaine or prescription amphetamines, stimulate the brain and nervous system, causing increased alertness. Depressants, such as barbiturates and benzodiazepines, slow activity in the brain and nervous system, causing relaxation. Hallucinogens, such as LSD and PCP, drastically disrupt the way the brain and nervous system communicate, causing hallucinations. Rehab: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver (HBO)
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