Research the history of the Treatment Center or facility.  What is their success rate?  Can you find any medical recommendations for them online from members of the established rehab or medical community?  How long has the Center been in operation?  Is their leadership on solid ground?  Are there any signs of financial corruption associated with the Center that is readily visible on the Internet?  It is your responsibility to dig for this information.  If you cannot find any information about a given Treatment Center online or at your local library, move on to the next Center on your list!
Drug abuse can apply to a wide variety of substances, from prescription medication to illicit street drugs. The term is often used to discuss the improper use of substances, especially substances that can be used for medical purposes. Drug abuse is not limited to those with a history of addiction, as many people develop a substance use disorder after taking prescription medications like opioids, benzodiazepines and more. Regular drug abuse can lead to serious patterns of behavior that result in a substance use disorder or addiction.

Outpatient treatment is the next step down in a continuum of care. It is also a rehabilitation option for individuals whose addiction is less severe and doesn’t require inpatient treatment. Clients in this phase of rehab drug treatment visit the facility regularly, but do not stay overnight. This approach allows the individual to receive drug treatment while maintaining family and job responsibilities.
Inpatient rehabilitation is an intensive form of treatment for drug and alcohol addiction that follows the medical detox phase. Inpatient rehab is offered at all The Recovery Village locations. This transition occurs only after a medical professional thoroughly evaluates each client. Those who receive inpatient treatment typically struggle with cravings and should be monitored around the clock to prevent relapse. This is especially important for individuals who are dependent on a particular substance and can’t go more than a few hours without it. While enrolled in this program, the nursing staff monitors clients 24/7.

There are several differences between inpatient and outpatient care. Inpatient care is a more intense level of care than outpatient care, which is often a step down from inpatient care. Unlike inpatient care, outpatient treatment does not require clients to stay overnight. Clients can come to the facility regularly (daily, weekly, etc.) for a set number of hours a week, and go home after their session. This allows them to maintain their work schedule and tend to any other off-site responsibilities. Care is less intensive than the inpatient level, as clients typically no longer require round-the-clock care.

Drug addiction is a disease of the body and brain. Also called substance use disorder, drug addiction triggers uncontrollable behaviors and renders a person unable to control their use of medication, alcohol, cigarettes, or drugs—whether they are legal or not. Addictive substances such as nicotine, alcohol, opioid medications, and marijuana are considered drugs just as much as heroin, cocaine, or methamphetamine. Once you are addicted to a substance, you will feel compelled to use it, regardless of the damage that use does to your body, your brain, and your life.


At Priory, we recognise that without appropriate treatment, alcohol addiction can result in a whole host of long-term physical and psychological problems, and can even be fatal. However, it’s important to understand that you don’t’ have to struggle alone; alcohol addiction is treatable and our medically trained, expert addiction treatment team, consisting of psychiatrists, psychologists and therapists, are able to offer comprehensive and personalised alcohol addiction treatment at our specialist hospitals and wellbeing centres.
"The most robust finding in the study is that those receiving any medication did much better than those who received no pills at all," says Professor Barbara Mason, Scripps Research Institute, and an author of the study. "This should be a wake-up call. With less than one percent of those seeking help for alcohol dependence receiving a prescription, medication is underutilized. Medication for alcoholism can offer patients an advantage for their recovery, especially in a real-world setting."
Cultural stereotypes of the alcoholic tend to focus on the Skid Row drunk: homeless, impoverished, and unemployed. But current research has replaced this stereotype with more realistic portraits of the most typical subtypes of alcoholics. The results of a national study published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence showed that there are five basic types of alcoholics in the United States. The descriptions of these subtypes, all of whom meet the criteria for alcohol dependence, may surprise you:
Within the framework of the 4th edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-IV), substance dependence is redefined as a drug addiction, and can be diagnosed without the occurrence of a withdrawal syndrome.[6] It was described accordingly: "When an individual persists in use of alcohol or other drugs despite problems related to use of the substance, substance dependence may be diagnosed. Compulsive and repetitive use may result in tolerance to the effect of the drug and withdrawal symptoms when use is reduced or stopped. This, along with Substance Abuse are considered Substance Use Disorders."[7] In the DSM-5 (released in 2013), substance abuse and substance dependence have been merged into the category of substance use disorders and they no longer exist as individual diagnosis.[8]
We recommend residential treatment for people who need specialised therapy for the simple fact that specialisation is not always available in an outpatient setting. Outpatient treatment programmes tend to be more generic in nature, while residential treatment is more tailored to the individual. In short, we recommend residential treatment to anyone who needs specialised care and individualised therapy.
This is an ongoing debate in the medical community, but it is generally agreed that there is no one cause for the development of addiction. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, contributing factors may include a genetic predisposition to develop addictive tendencies, an environment that is permissive of drug abuse, access to illicit substances, and certain developmental issues. The existence of a Dual Diagnosis is one of the biggest risk factors for the development of addiction. Heroin Withdrawal | First Week In
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