Like any other life-threatening disease, drug addiction requires intensive treatment by credentialed specialists. While some may be able to find recovery alone, true healing is a lifelong process that typically requires continued support. Drug addiction treatment options range from medical detox and inpatient care to 12-step programming, pharmacotherapy and outpatient services. Throughout a continuum of care, patients are offered resources, skills and support to ensure that they’re making progress toward recovery goals.
^ Nestler EJ (December 2013). "Cellular basis of memory for addiction". Dialogues Clin. Neurosci. 15 (4): 431–443. PMC 3898681. PMID 24459410. Despite the importance of numerous psychosocial factors, at its core, drug addiction involves a biological process: the ability of repeated exposure to a drug of abuse to induce changes in a vulnerable brain that drive the compulsive seeking and taking of drugs, and loss of control over drug use, that define a state of addiction. ... A large body of literature has demonstrated that such ΔFosB induction in D1-type [nucleus accumbens] neurons increases an animal's sensitivity to drug as well as natural rewards and promotes drug self-administration, presumably through a process of positive reinforcement ... Another ΔFosB target is cFos: as ΔFosB accumulates with repeated drug exposure it represses c-Fos and contributes to the molecular switch whereby ΔFosB is selectively induced in the chronic drug-treated state.41. ... Moreover, there is increasing evidence that, despite a range of genetic risks for addiction across the population, exposure to sufficiently high doses of a drug for long periods of time can transform someone who has relatively lower genetic loading into an addict.
We review all of these options with each outgoing resident to make sure that they have the best plan to work with their routines and needs. Whether you are able to engage with the program for hours or minutes, we will find the simplest and most effective way for you to participate in our aftercare program. We want you to succeed and will do everything we can to make this final stage both accessible and productive in order to support you in maintaining sobriety on your own time.
If you’re suffering from addiction or are considering drug rehab for a loved one, we strongly advise that you do extensive research on the various options available. The ability to make an informed decision, and the type of rehab that you choose, could impact the likelihood of success considerably. And remember that it’s in your best interest to seek the advice of a trained medical professional.

Depending on your treatment priorities, you may also want to consider a facility that shares your philosophy. For instance, some people prefer faith-based rehabs if their religion is important to them. Others may choose to enroll in a holistic treatment center that utilizes alternative and complementary practices, such as acupuncture, meditation, and yoga. Regardless of the treatment program you choose, it’s important to confirm that it possesses the above-mentioned qualities.
For example, drinking as a way of coping with difficulties or stress, instead of confronting the sources of those difficulties or stressors, is an early indication that someone is relying too heavily on alcohol. Feelings of shame during or after drinking, or trying to hide evidence of drinking, point to a person who is not in control of their drinking habits.
We review all of these options with each outgoing resident to make sure that they have the best plan to work with their routines and needs. Whether you are able to engage with the program for hours or minutes, we will find the simplest and most effective way for you to participate in our aftercare program. We want you to succeed and will do everything we can to make this final stage both accessible and productive in order to support you in maintaining sobriety on your own time.
Because prescription drugs are produced in laboratories and prescribed by doctors, they are mistakenly perceived as “safer” than street drugs. However, the risks of overdose, respiratory depression, cardiac arrest, and accidental death are equal to any other opioid narcotic. Withdrawal can be extremely uncomfortable, with symptoms that resemble a bad flu, such as a runny nose, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, muscle aches, shakiness, and cold sweats.
Current clinical research suggests that marijuana use can have long-lasting effects on learning and memory, especially for users who start in adolescence, when the brain is still developing. Addiction Science & Clinical Practice states that approximately 9 percent of individuals who try marijuana become dependent on the drug, compared to 15 percent of cocaine users and 24 percent of heroin users. However, because marijuana is more readily available than these other illicit drugs, marijuana addiction has become more widespread, and marijuana detox programs have become more common.
Cultural stereotypes of the alcoholic tend to focus on the Skid Row drunk: homeless, impoverished, and unemployed. But current research has replaced this stereotype with more realistic portraits of the most typical subtypes of alcoholics. The results of a national study published in Drug and Alcohol Dependence showed that there are five basic types of alcoholics in the United States. The descriptions of these subtypes, all of whom meet the criteria for alcohol dependence, may surprise you:
Relapse prevention. Patients can use medications to help re-establish normal brain function and decrease cravings. Medications are available for treatment of opioid (heroin, prescription pain relievers), tobacco (nicotine), and alcohol addiction. Scientists are developing other medications to treat stimulant (cocaine, methamphetamine) and cannabis (marijuana) addiction. People who use more than one drug, which is very common, need treatment for all of the substances they use.
How pro-active is the Treatment Center’s approach toward preventing relapse?  Does the Treatment Center place greater priority on profit or on getting people free from addiction?  What precedence does the Treatment Center set on educating residents about drug and alcohol abuse?  What is the philosophy or view of the Treatment Center on healing drug and alcohol addiction?  Is healing drug and alcohol addiction perceived as a process that is forged through developing a stronger spiritual relationship with God?  Is God acknowledged as part of the healing process at the Treatment Center?  Are residents in the Treatment Center embraced as a community and nurtured by those that have completed the process?
DBT is designed to be supportive in every way, helping addicts discover their strengths and using those strengths to build defence mechanisms against relapse; because of its origins in CBT, dialectical behavioural treatment is also able to help the addict identify the negative thought processes and beliefs which act as obstacles in the way of a person’s ability to overcome their particular problems.
We recommend residential treatment for people who need specialised therapy for the simple fact that specialisation is not always available in an outpatient setting. Outpatient treatment programmes tend to be more generic in nature, while residential treatment is more tailored to the individual. In short, we recommend residential treatment to anyone who needs specialised care and individualised therapy.
According to the Addiction Center, moving into a sober living home after treatment is often the difference between going back to old habits or continuing on the path of sobriety. Sober living homes are not as rigorous as inpatient facilities. They are often secondary treatments used in conjunction with other programs, as opposed to primary options.
Problem drinking soon progresses to physical dependency. At this stage, you have probably developed a tolerance to alcohol and require more of it to feel the same level of enjoyment as before. This increased consumption can cause your body to get used to alcohol. When you are not using it, or the effects begin to wear off, you will experience physical withdrawal symptoms such as a rapid heartbeat, sweating, tremors, and nausea.
Cognitive–Behavioral Therapy can take place one-on-one with a therapist or in small groups. This form of therapy is focused on identifying the feelings and situations (called “cues”) that lead to heavy drinking and managing stress that can lead to relapse. The goal is to change the thought processes that lead to excessive drinking and to develop the skills necessary to cope with everyday situations that might trigger problem drinking. Opioid Addiction and its Treatment | Dr. Belis Aladag - UCLA Health
Quality of life improvement. Drug rehab is about helping the patient learn how to avoid relapse on an ongoing basis, but it should also be about helping patients to improve their daily experience. This happens when they are given the assistance they need to handle the other issues in their life that may be diminishing their ability to remain clean and sober. Health problems, legal issues, family problems – all these and more should be addressed on an as-needed basis at an effective addiction treatment program.

Remember though, overcoming alcoholism is a process. Less than half of individuals relapse after achieving one year of sobriety. That number reduces to less than 15 percent who relapse after five years of sobriety. For the greatest chance of long-term sobriety after completing an inpatient or outpatient program, you should participate in local support groups and continue with counseling. Treating alcoholism is an investment in your future. It will not only make a huge difference in your life, but also the lives of those around you such as family members and friends.
Drugs, Addiction, and the Brain explores the molecular, cellular, and neurocircuitry systems in the brain that are responsible for drug addiction. Common neurobiological elements are emphasized that provide novel insights into how the brain mediates the acute rewarding effects of drugs of abuse and how it changes during the transition from initial drug use to compulsive drug use and addiction. The book provides a detailed overview of the pathophysiology of the disease. The information provided will be useful for neuroscientists in the field of addiction, drug abuse treatment providers, and undergraduate and postgraduate students who are interested in learning the diverse effects of drugs of abuse on the brain.
Don't let financial constraints stop you from living a life free of alcoholism. Regardless of whether you don't have insurance, your insurance benefits ran out, or your insurance refuses to cover your alcohol dependency treatment, you can get treatment. Free alcohol rehabilitation is available if you really want it. By admitting you have a problem and need help you have already completed the first and most important step of pursuing a life of sobriety.
Research the history of the Treatment Center or facility.  What is their success rate?  Can you find any medical recommendations for them online from members of the established rehab or medical community?  How long has the Center been in operation?  Is their leadership on solid ground?  Are there any signs of financial corruption associated with the Center that is readily visible on the Internet?  It is your responsibility to dig for this information.  If you cannot find any information about a given Treatment Center online or at your local library, move on to the next Center on your list! 3 Stages of Drug Alcohol Rehab-How It Works
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